NAGT > Professional Development > Sponsored Sessions and Events > 2014 GSA

NAGT Activities at 2014 GSA Annual Meeting

NAGT is pleased to sponsor a variety of symposia and sessions at the Annual Meeting of the Geological Society of America meeting held in Vancouver, BC, October 19-22, 2014. Please submit an abstract and plan to attend the following sessions highlighting key issues of importance to geoscience educators at all levels. You can also come by the NAGT booth to meet officers and other NAGT members and to learn more about you can be involved in your organization. More information about NAGT activities at GSA will be added to this page as it becomes available.

Connect Via Social Media

Have you every learned about something fun and interesting that happened at the meeting after the fact, or even after the meeting? Of course, you have. And by the same token, you've probably found something that you wish your colleagues and friends had known about but couldn't get word to them. Again this year, NAGT is going to try to make it easier to know about things that are going on all across this vast meeting by using social media. If you know of something that you think other geoscience educators should know about, just send a tweet to @nagtgeo and include the hashtag #nagtgsa14. We'll be gathering all those tweets together on a page so that we can all benefit in near-real time.

Jump down to: Workshops | Field Trips | Topical Sessions | Meetings and Receptions

Workshops Early Registration Deadline: September 15

NAGT is again sponsoring the NAGT 4-Pack and there are a number of other education-themed workshops as well. Click here for a full listing of workshops at the GSA Annual Meeting. You can register for a workshop via the GSA website.

NAGT 4-Pack

The cost for one workshop is US$50, or get two-for-one! Combine a morning workshop (517A or 517B) with an afternoon workshop (517C or 517D) for the same price!

517A. Teaching Geoscience in Society: Building Relevance and Interest in the Geosciences by Adding InTeGrate Resources to Your Class

When: Sat., 18 Oct., 8 a.m.–noon
Where: Harbour Centre, Boardroom 2280
Cost: US$50 for one course — or get two-for-one! — pay the same amount when combined with an afternoon course (add 517C or 517D)
Instructors: Anne Egger, Central Washington Univ.; David McConnell, North Carolina State Univ.
Cosponsors: National Association of Geoscience Teachers; GSA Geoscience Education Division
CEU: 0.4 | Max. class size: 40

Course Description

What can we do to reframe the geosciences in ways that engage students in our classes? How do we prepare these students for a future where they will confront climate change, water availability issues, resource depletion, and other grand challenges that will require a robust understanding of the intersection between the geosciences and society? One key strategy is to incorporate these issues into geoscience teaching at all levels and for all students. InTeGrate has developed a set of community-built modules that directly address Earth-related grand challenges. These modular units can be adopted wholesale or in parts, and each feature resources to develop students' abilities to address interdisciplinary problems, improve geoscientific thinking skills, make use of authentic geoscience data, and incorporate systems thinking. These materials have been developed and tested by faculty at a variety of types of institutions and come with built in assessments and resources for both instructors and students. Topics range from environmental justice and freshwater resources to climate change, mineral resources, sustainable land use, and natural hazards. In this workshop, we will explore the InTeGrate materials, discuss the underlying design rubric, and work with participants to adapt the materials to their institutional and geographic setting.

517B. Improving Spatial Thinking in the Geological Sciences

When: Sat., 18 Oct., 8 a.m.–noon
Where: Harbour Centre, Boardroom 2290
Cost: US$50 for one course — or get two-for-one! — pay the same amount when combined with an afternoon course (add 517C or 517D)
Instructors: Basil Tikoff, Univ. of Wisconsin–Madison; Tim Shipley, Temple Univ.
Cosponsors: National Association of Geoscience Teachers; GSA Geoscience Education Division
CEU: 0.4 | Max. class size: 40

Course Description

This course is designed to help educators improve students' spatial reasoning. The material is a based on a decade-long collaboration between cognitive scientists, geoscience educators, and geoscience researchers through SILC (Spatial Intelligence and Learning Center). The workshop consists of mostly hands-on activities with some introductory lectures. Lectures will focus on known difficulties in student learning of spatial skills, laboratory studies designed to evaluate and improve spatial skills, and a cognitive framework for addressing spatial cognition. Hands-on sessions will highlight effective interventions that can be used in a geoscience classroom, including artificial intelligence–based approaches to sketching.

517C. Student Learning Outcomes and Program Assessment

When: Sat., 18 Oct., 1–5 p.m.
Where: Harbour Centre, Boardroom 2280
Cost: US$50 for one course — or get two-for-one! — pay the same amount when combined with a morning course (add 517A or 517B)
Instructors: David Mogk, Montana State Univ.; Mary Savina, Carleton College
Cosponsors: National Association of Geoscience Teachers; GSA Geoscience Education Division
CEU: 0.4 | Max. class size: 40

Course Description

This course is intended for department heads/chairs and faculty interested in curriculum development at the department level. This interactive workshop will use the "matrix method of curriculum design" to help you define student learning outcomes related to mastery of geologic concepts and content, technical skills used in the geosciences, geoscience "habits of mind," higher-order thinking skills, and other professional skills (e.g., communication, quantitative, interpersonal, information). This approach can be used as a guide for faculty to define course goals and specific student learning outcomes in individual courses. In aggregate, this method can be used to map student learning outcomes for entire degree programs to identify areas of strength in departments or to conduct a gap analysis in course offerings. The results can then be used to assess degree programs with respect to the current state of knowledge and conduct of modern geoscience, expectations for students entering the workforce, and alignment of degree programs with departmental or institutional role and scope statements. This workshop will help you explore the student learning outcomes that are most important to your degree program(s) as they apply to your students, institutional type, geographic setting, breadth of disciplines covered in your department, departmental resources, and faculty.

517D. Extreme Makeover Geosciences Style—Infusing Existing Curricula with the Spirit of the New Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS): Integrating Content, Scientific and Design Practices, and Cross-Cutting Themes

When: Sat., 18 Oct., 1–5 p.m.
Where: Harbour Centre, Boardroom 2290
Cost: US$50 for one course — or get two-for-one! — pay the same amount when combined with a morning course (add 517A or 517B)
Instructors: Aida Awad, Maine East High School; Susan Buhr, Univ. of Colorado; Sara Harris, Univ. of British Columbia
Cosponsors: National Association of Geoscience Teachers; GSA Geoscience Education Division
CEU: 0.4 | Max. class size: 40

Course Description

What happens when you give your existing curricula an extreme makeover? During this half-day workshop, we'll work together to infuse existing curricula with the spirit of the Next Generation Science Standards: integrating content, scientific and design practices, and cross-cutting themes. Increase your impact by including more systems thinking, modeling, designing solutions to global challenges, and quantitative thinking in your instruction. The approach we will take is relevant to instruction from pre-college through undergraduate levels and teacher professional development. The workshop will include an introduction to the Next Generation Science Standards, an opportunity to experience teaching material examples before and after, and working in small groups to makeover one of your own lessons or units.

NAGT Geo2YC Division Workshops

519A. Digital Mapping and Data Collection for Field Environments

When: Sat., 18 Oct., 8 a.m.–noon
Where: Centre for Dialogue, Strategy Room 320
Cost: US$50 for one course — or get two-for-one! — pay the same amount when combined with an afternoon course (add 519C or 519D)
Instructors: Steven Whitmeyer, James Madison Univ.; Terry Pavlis, Univ. of Texas–El Paso; Lawrence Malinconico, Lafayette College; Richard Langford, Univ. of Texas–El Paso
Cosponsors: GSA Environmental and Engineering Geology Division; GSA Geobiology & Geomicrobiology Division; GSA Geoscience Education Division, GSA Hydrogeology Division; GSA Mineralogy, Geochemistry, Petrology, and Volcanology Division; GSA Sedimentary Geology Division; GSA Structural Geology and Tectonics Division; and the National Association of Geoscience Teachers Geo2YC Division
CEU: 0.4 | Max. class size: 30

Course Description

This half-day short course will focus on digital field mapping and data collection, and provide participants with hands-on exposure to modern hardware and software solutions. The course will emphasize proven hardware/software solutions, such as QGIS (Quantum GIS) and ArcGIS, and mobile apps, such as iGIS and GeoFieldBook. Other software and hardware options will be discussed, and participants should plan to relate their own experiences with digital field equipment and methods. The course will conclude with discussions of the limitations of various hardware and software solutions, and potential technologies of the future. Mobile devices will be provided for participants to use. All participants must bring their own laptops.

519B. GigaPan and GigaMacro for the Geosciences

When: Sat., 18 Oct., 8 a.m.–noon
Where: Centre for Dialogue, Executive Room 370
Cost: US$50 for one course — or get two-for-one! — pay the same amount when combined with an afternoon course (add 519C or 519D)
Instructors: Jennifer Piatek, Central Connecticut State Univ.; Bill Richards, North Idaho College; Ron Schott, Bakersfield College
Cosponsors: GSA Environmental and Engineering Geology Division; GSA Geobiology & Geomicrobiology Division; GSA Geoscience Education Division, GSA Hydrogeology Division; GSA Mineralogy, Geochemistry, Petrology, and Volcanology Division; GSA Sedimentary Geology Division; GSA Structural Geology and Tectonics Division; and the National Association of Geoscience Teachers Geo2YC Division
CEU: 0.4 | Max. class size: 30

Course Description

This half-day course will focus on the use of GigaPans in the classroom and as research tools. The course will emphasize use of gigapixel images such as GigaPans in classroom settings, as field datasets, and as "virtual lab materials." We will touch briefly on the creation of GigaPan images, but plan to focus on the utility of these images rather than collecting them. We will guide participants in exploring the GigaPan website, including advanced search techniques and organization of pans into galleries, as well as strategies for presenting pans in embedded webpages and different viewers. We will explore how GigaPans can be used as field trip "guides," both as a virtual field experience and as an extension of information available when in the field. Participants are encouraged to bring their own computers to take advantage of the hands-on experience.

519C. Google Maps Engine, Earth Engine, and Big GeoData

When: Sat., 18 Oct., 1–5 p.m.
Where: Centre for Dialogue, Strategy Room 320
Cost: US$50 for one course — or get two-for-one! — pay the same amount when combined with a morning course (add 519A or 519B)
Instructors: Jeffrey Ryan, Univ. of South Florida; Kristen St. John, James Madison Univ.
Cosponsors: GSA Environmental and Engineering Geology Division; GSA Geobiology & Geomicrobiology Division; GSA Geoscience Education Division, GSA Hydrogeology Division; GSA Mineralogy, Geochemistry, Petrology, and Volcanology Division; GSA Sedimentary Geology Division; GSA Structural Geology and Tectonics Division; and the National Association of Geoscience Teachers Geo2YC Division
CEU: 0.4 | Max. class size: 30

Course Description

Maps Engine and Earth Engine, newly available Google data management and visualization tools, permit student co-creation and visualization of large geoscience data sets in either the Google Maps or Google Earth platforms. This half-day short course will introduce Maps Engine and Earth Engine, guide participants in the development of tailored visualizations working with global marine geoscience data from the International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) and the Integrated Earth Data Applications (IEDA) informatics portal, and highlight effective instructional strategies for investigating fundamental geoscience questions and issues via global geo-datasets.

519D. Using Google Earth to Teach Interpretation of Geologic Processes, Bedrock Structures, and Geologic History

When: Sat., 18 Oct., 1–5 p.m.
Where: Centre for Dialogue, Executive Room 370
Cost: US$50 for one course — or get two-for-one! — pay the same amount when combined with a morning course (add 519A or 519B)
Instructors: Barbara Tewksbury, Hamilton College; Heather Almquist, Univ. of Montana
Cosponsors: GSA Environmental and Engineering Geology Division; GSA Geobiology & Geomicrobiology Division; GSA Geoscience Education Division, GSA Hydrogeology Division; GSA Mineralogy, Geochemistry, Petrology, and Volcanology Division; GSA Sedimentary Geology Division; GSA Structural Geology and Tectonics Division; and the National Association of Geoscience Teachers Geo2YC Division
CEU: 0.4 | Max. class size: 30

Course Description

This half-day course will have two tracks. Track 1 will be aimed primarily at college/university-level faculty and will give participants hands-on experience with a powerful strategy for using Google Earth to visualize bedrock structures in 3D, create geologic maps and construct cross sections, and learn to interpret geologic structures from outcrop patterns both in Google Earth and on geologic maps. Track 2 will be aimed primarily at pre-service and in-service K–12 teachers and will give participants hands-on experience with a versatile method for allowing students to explore the geology of a local area and create tours in Google Earth that describe aspects of geology and geologic history. During the last portion of the workshop, each participant will have the opportunity to continue working in his/her original track or switch tracks for an abbreviated introduction to the other approach.

Other NAGT-Sponsored Workshops

518A. Teaching Controversial Issues 1: Climate and Energy

When: Sat., 18 Oct., 8 a.m.–noon
Where: Centre for Dialogue, Executive Room 470
Cost: US$35 for one course — or get two-for-one! — pay the same amount when combined with an afternoon course (add 518D, 518E, or 518F)
Instructors: Don Duggan-Haas, Paleontological Research Institution and its Museum of the Earth; Glenn Dolphin, Univ. of Calgary; Laura Guertin, Pennsylvania State–Brandywine; Scott Mandia, Suffolk County Community College; Ronert Ross, Paleontological Research Institute and its Museum of the Earth
Cosponsors: National Association of Geoscience Teachers; GSA Geoscience Education Division; GSA History and Philosophy of Geology Division
CEU: 0.4 | Max. class size: 30

Course Description

Climate and energy are topics rife with controversy, which provides challenges and opportunities for teaching. This is one of two connected courses on controversial issues that may be taken separately or together. Questions addressed include: Why are certain issues controversial? How do controversial issues differ from one another? How can we help learners focus on deepening understandings rather than fortifying positions? What does the history of controversy teach us about dealing with these issues? Both courses will investigate the teaching of controversial issues from theoretical perspectives and provide nuts-and-bolts strategies to make teaching such topics more effective and less divisive.

518D. Teaching Controversial Issues 2: Evolution of Life and Earth

When: Sat., 18 Oct., 1–5 p.m.
Where: Centre for Dialogue, Executive Room 470
Cost: US$35 for one course — or get two-for-one! — pay the same amount when combined with a morning course (add 518A, 518B, or 518C)
Instructors: Don Duggan-Haas, Paleontological Research Institution and its Museum of the Earth; Glenn Dolphin, Univ. of Calgary; Laura Guertin, Pennsylvania State–Brandywine; Scott Mandia, Suffolk County Community College; Ronert Ross, Paleontological Research Institute and its Museum of the Earth
Cosponsors: National Association of Geoscience Teachers; GSA Geoscience Education Division; GSA History and Philosophy of Geology Division
CEU: 0.4 | Max. class size: 30

Course Description

Evolutionary history and ocean science are rife with controversy, which provides challenges and opportunities for teaching. This is one of two connected courses on controversial issues that may be taken separately or together. Questions addressed include: Why are certain issues controversial? How do controversial issues differ from one another? How can we help learners focus on deepening understandings rather than fortifying positions? What does the history of controversy teach us about dealing with these issues? Both courses will investigate the teaching of controversial issues from theoretical perspectives and provide nuts-and-bolts strategies to make teaching such topics more effective and less divisive.

Field Trips

There are a number of fantastic field trip opportunities being planned for the 2014 Annual Meeting. Here are two that may be of particular interest to NAGT members. To see descriptions of all the others, see the Field Trips information page on the Annual Meeting website.

416. Full Access to the Geology of the Sea-to-Sky Highway

Sat., 18 Oct.
Cost: Professional(A): US$100 L; Student(B): US$23 L.
Students: Prior to registering, contact info@theiagd.org for payment of trip fee.
Leaders: Brett Gilley, Univ. of British Columbia; Christopher Atchison
Cosponsors: International Association for Geoscience Diversity; Society for Exploration Geophysicists; GSA Diversity Committee

Trip Description

This fully inclusive and accessible field trip is designed to support students with disabilities working in geoscience field courses. The sea-to-sky highway (Hwy 99) winds along the picturesque Howe Sound fjord between Metro Vancouver and Whistler. The steep glacially carved slopes increase the risk of a variety of natural Hazards, especially from landslides and related events. This field trip has two primary objectives: (1) to provide a fully-inclusive field-based learning experience for students with a variety of disabilities (cognitive, deaf/hard-of-hearing, blind/low-vision, and orthopedic/mobility); and (2) to provide a unique training opportunity for geoscience faculty learning how to accommodate students with disabilities in geoscience field courses, by pairing them with the students where they can learn from one another. Active learning will be an important part of this trip, at each stop students and faculty should expect to consider their surroundings and use their observations to make inferences about the processes which shaped, and continue to shape each location.

Primary leader: Brett Gilley, University of British Columbia

Brett Gilley has been trying to decide if he is a geologist or an educational developer since 2003. He completed his masters in earth science at Simon Fraser Univ. and immediately became involved in running teaching workshops, designing courses, and alternately inspiring and scaring students. He has taught at more post-secondary institutions in the Vancouver area than he cares to admit, and is currently working in the Earth and Ocean Sciences Department at UBC as part of the Carl Wieman Science Education Initiative. Gilley has been involved in running variations of this field trip since the late 1990s and has led this trip more than 30 times. He currently runs this trip as an optional component of EOSC 114–The Catastrophic Earth: Natural Disasters at the Univ. of British Columbia, a course that reaches ~1,000 students per semester.

419. Sea-to-Sky Geotour for Teachers

Sun., 19 Oct.
Cost: US$85 L
Leaders: Malaika Ulmi, Geological Survey of Canada; Melanie Kelman, Dylan Watt
Cosponsors: MineralsEd; Geological Survey of Canada

Trip Description

This all-day tour will present, through a series of outcrop stops led by GSC geoscientists and partnership with a classroom teacher, key geologic features between Vancouver and Whistler that reveal the region's long, interesting and complex natural history. Following NRCan's 2010 Sea to Sky GeoTour, the field trip will highlight the main geologic elements (granitic bed rock, deformed volcanic and sedimentary roof pendants, and late stage volcanics), unravel the geological history (mountain building, volcanism, glaciation), and discuss the natural geologic hazards related to this unique geologic setting. It will also include a stop at the Britannia Mine Museum, a National Historical Site, to learn about its mining history and ongoing remediation. This field trip will benefit teachers at all grade levels who teach units related to Earth Science or geology, mineral resources and mining.

Primary leader: Malaika Ulmi, Geological Survey of Canada

Malaika Ulmi is a geologist with the Geological Survey of Canada who has developed an interest and experience in the science-policy interface through her work with jurisdictions at risk from natural hazards. She worked for 5 years in South America on a CIDA-funded collaborative project with geoscience organizations, civil defense, and local governments to make communities safer through science-based land use and emergency management planning. Ulmi is a co-author of the NRCan Sea to Sky GeoTour guidebook. She has partnered with MineralsEd to lead professional development field trips for B.C. teachers for many years, including the Sea-to-Sky Geology, Downtown Vancouver Geotour, Stanley Park Geotour, Nanaimo Geotour, and Victoria Geotour. Currently, she is part of the GSC's Public Safety Geoscience Program, working on research to provide the science and methods to assist decision makers in reducing risk from natural hazards. She also contributes to a groundwater assessment project and marine-based seismic surveys. When not at work, Ulmi can be found on roads and trails, running, skiing, and biking.

Topical Sessions Abstract Deadline - July 29

There are a lot of great education-themed topical sessions slated for the meeting this year, and NAGT is sponsoring 15 of them (see below). You can see all of the Education sessions on the GSA website. The deadline to submit abstracts is July 29, 2014.

T56. Ushering in a New Era in K–16 Geoscience Education

Michael J. Passow, Glenn R. Dolphin
National Earth Science Teachers Association; National Association of Geoscience Teachers; GSA Geoscience Education Division
What are effective strategies to implement Next Generation Science Standards in U.S. schools, address critical issues such as climate change, and incorporate data-driven authentic inquiry?

T57. Digital Geology Sandpit (Digital Posters)

Declan G. De Paor, Steven J. Whitmeyer, Callan Bentley
GSA Geoscience Education Division; GSA Structural Geology and Tectonics Division; GSA Quaternary Geology and Geomorphology Division; GSA Hydrogeology Division; GSA Archaeological Geology Division; GSA Limnogeology Division; GSA Geobiology & Geomicrobiology Division; GSA Mineralogy, Geochemistry, Petrology, and Volcanology Division; GSA Geology and Society Division; GSA Environmental and Engineering; GSA Sedimentary Geology Division; GSA Geophysics Division; GSA Geoinformatics Division; National Association of Geoscience Teachers
Get hands-on experience with the latest greatest digital technologies—hardware and software. Present on flat screens, sit at tables, and share your favorite mobile apps for geoscience education and research. (DIGITAL POSTER SESSION)

T61. Spatial Thinking in Geoscience Teaching, Learning, and Professional Practice

Heather L. Petcovic, Carol J. Ormand, Robert W. Krantz
GSA Geoscience Education Division; National Association of Geoscience Teachers; American Association of Petroleum Geologists Committee for Structural Interpretation; GSA Structural Geology and Tectonics Division; GSA Geophysics Division
Skills in spatial thinking and visualization are considered integral to geoscience learning and practice. This session considers research across educational settings and professional practice, as well as teaching aimed at enhancing spatial-visual skills.

T62. Supporting Student Success in Colleges and Universities

Robert H. Blodgett, Norlene R. Emerson, Bruce E. Herbert
National Association of Geoscience Teachers; GSA Geoscience Education Division; NAGT Geo2YC Division; Supporting and Advancing Geoscience Education at Two-Year Colleges (SAGE 2YC) Program
Presentations can address working with underserved subpopulations (e.g. first generation students, students with disabilities), promoting self-reflection and metacognition, motivating students, improving study skills, reducing math/science/nature anxiety and stereotype threat, and other topics.

T63. International Field Experiences in the Geological Sciences

Miriam Barquero-Molina, Robert L. Bauer
National Association of Geoscience Teachers
We seek presentations on international programs promoting student field study experiences completed outside the United States. In addition to description of the geological activities, presentations will include descriptions of associated logistical, administrative, and financial issues.

T64. Transdisciplinary Thinking in Geoscience Education at Two-Year and Four-Year Colleges: Innovations in Curriculum, Pedagogy, and Assessment in Introductory Geoscience Courses

Benjamin Wolfe, Merry Wilson
National Association of Geoscience Teachers
Effective interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary curriculum practices are essential for student success in introductory geoscience courses. Submissions may include learning communities, service and field-based learning, writing across the curriculum, and learning outcomes assessment.

T65. Successful Models of Blended/Hybrid Learning Environments in the Geosciences

David A. McConnell, Elizabeth Nagy-Shadman, Timothy J. Bralower
GSA Geoscience Education Division; National Association of Geoscience Teachers
This session will describe examples of courses featuring blended or hybrid learning formats that combine aspects of online learning and face-to-face instruction. We encourage submissions that assess learning in comparison to more traditional class environments.

T66. Transformative Innovations in Undergraduate Geoscience Education Supported by NSF Funding Programs: Accomplishments and Future Directions

Jeffrey Ryan, Jill Singer
National Association of Geoscience Teachers
This session highlights successful NSF-supported efforts to improve undergraduate geoscience education, the strategies of high-impact projects, and future needs in this area that are amenable to NSF support.

T67. Supporting Successful Student Transfer between Two-Year Colleges and Four-year Colleges and Universities

Eric M.D. Baer, Benjamin A. Wolfe, Carolyn Wilson
GSA Geoscience Education Division; National Association of Geoscience Teachers
Topics might include advising and support strategies, articulation agreements, curricular alignment, ongoing 2YC–4YC faculty interactions, cross-institutional student research projects and field trips, summer bridge programs, recruitment programs, and/or research on transfer patterns.

T70. Undertaking Environmental- and Geoscience-Related Research Investigation as Part of Experiential Learning, Comprehension, and Critical Thinking Aspects: Involvement of K12–16 Students (Posters)

Nazrul I. Khandaker
National Association of Geoscience Teachers; GSA Geology and Society Division; GSA Environmental and Engineering Geology Division; GSA Geoscience Education Division; Council on Undergraduate Research Geoscienced Division
This topical session is primarily aimed at opening doors to K12–16 students to share their basic geology and environmental research information with the participants as part of experiential learning, comprehension, and critical thinking aspects.

T71. Climate Literacy: Formal and Informal Education and Outreach Efforts to Increase Awareness and Enable Responsible Decisions

Tamara Shapiro Ledley, Katherine K. Ellins, Frank Niepold, Susan B. Sullivan
GSA Geoscience Education Division; National Association of Geoscience Teachers; CLEAN Network
Papers focusing on efforts for pre-college (students & teachers), higher education, informal education audiences, and outreach, including materials, activities, curriculum, capstone projects, service learning, professional development programs, community activities, and the arts, are encouraged.

T74. Geoscience Field Education: The Implications of Research and Practice for Workforce Development

Heather L. Petcovic, Alison Stokes, Joshua L. Caulkins
GSA Geoscience Education Division; National Association of Geoscience Teachers
This session considers examples of both formal and informal educational field experiences, research on teaching and learning in the field, and the role of fieldwork in developing the future geoscience workforce.


Meetings and Receptions

Dates, times, and locations for business meetings and receptions will be posted as they become available. Be sure to check back soon.


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