Dave Mogk

This page is part of a collection of profiles of people involved in SERC-hosted projects The profiles include an automatically generated list of each individual's involvement in the projects. If you are a community member you may view your page and add a bio and photo by visiting your account page

Earth Sciences
Montana State University-Bozeman

I am a metamorphic petrologist by training with long-term research interests in evolution of Archean continental crust in SW Montana, and in mid-crustal petrogenetic procescesses (migmatite formation).  I have also worked on the surface chemistry of minerals using a variety of spectroscopic methods (Auger and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Time-of-Flight SIMS), life in extreme environments (Lake Vostok ice core, Yellowstone acid-sulfate hot springs), and fluid inclusions of submarine hydrothermal systems.  My interests in geoscience (and STEM) education began in 1992 in response to reading Project 2061 Science for All  Americans (AAAS, 1989). My first NSF/CCD project was to develop an Environmental Geology Course Using a Question-Asking Problem-Solving approach.  At that time I was concerned about the low level of participation by geoscientists in NSF education programs, and subsequently served as Program Officer  at NSF in the Division of Undergraduate Education (1995-96). Since that  time I have been involved with:  teacher preparation (Collaboratives for Excellence  in Teacher Preparation); digital libraries (co-author of the DLESE Community Plan and the NSDL Pathways to Progress plans); geo-ed community-building  events (Teaching Mineralogy workshop; Scrutiny of Undergraduate Geoscience Eduation; Shaping the Future of Undergraduate Geoscience Education; Using Data in the Classroom); discipline-based education research (Bringing Research on Learning to the Geosciences; co-editor Earth and Mind; NRC report 2012). I am recipient of the 2000 AGU Award for Excellence in Geophysics Education.  I have also served on NSF Committees of Visitors, EarthScope Science and Education Committee, EarthChem Advisory Board, GSA Chair of Education Division and Education Committee, Associate Editor GSA Bulletin and American Mineralogist.  I have recently been appointed as Head of the Dept. of Earth Sciences (a 3 year sentence), and thus my new self-identity.

Materials Contributed through SERC-hosted Projects

Project Leader on these Projects(3)

Cutting Edge part of Cutting Edge
The On the Cutting Edge project helps geoscience faculty stay up-to-date with both geoscience research and teaching methods through workshops and websites which combine to provide professional development opportunities, resources, and opportunities for faculty to interact with colleagues around the world.

Microbial Life - Educational Resources part of Microbial Life
This site contains a variety of educational and supporting materials for students and teachers of microbiology. You will find information about microorganisms, extremophiles and extreme habitats, as well as links to online provides information about the ecology, diversity and evolution of micro-organisms for students, K-12 teachers, university faculty, and the general public.

Integrating Research and Education part of Integrating Research and Education
This website contains educational modules and digital library technologies that can be used to translate exciting new scientific discoveries into effective instructional practice.

Activities (12)

Critical Review of a Journal Article: An Assessment Activity part of Cutting Edge:Petrology:Teaching Examples
In this exercise students do a formal review of a journal article using review criteria established for the Geological Society of America Bulletin or American Mineralogist. The quality of the students' reviews is used to assess the degree of understanding of fundamental geological principles, concepts, and applications.

On the Cutting Edge Exemplary Collection This activity is part of the On the Cutting Edge Exemplary Teaching Activities collection.
Learn more about this review process.

Guided Discovery and Scoring Rubric for Petrographic Analysis of a Thin Section part of Cutting Edge:Metacognition:Activities
A guided discovery approach is used to "unpack" the methods and observations used by "master" petrographers in the petrographic analysis of a thin section. A series of spread sheets are used to direct students to make appropriate observations to systematically a) identify minerals in thin section, b) describe rock textures to interpret petrogenetic processes and geologic history, and c) apply this information to address questions of geologic significance.

On the Cutting Edge Exemplary Collection This activity is part of the On the Cutting Edge Exemplary Teaching Activities collection.
Learn more about this review process.

Calculating Compositional Variation and Common Substitutions for Igneous and Metamorphic Minerals part of Cutting Edge:Petrology:Teaching Examples
This problem set uses Excel spreadsheets to calculate mineral formulae from analytical data (typically from the electron microprobe) using a variety of formulations that assume numerous variations of crystal chemical constraints. Ferric iron is recalculated based on charge balance and stoichiometry. End members and mole fractions are also calculated in many instances.

On the Cutting Edge Exemplary Collection This activity is part of the On the Cutting Edge Exemplary Teaching Activities collection.
Learn more about this review process.

Directed Discovery of Crystal Structures part of Cutting Edge:Mineralogy:Activities
This online exercise uses a "discovery-based" approach and the latest online crystallographic information and visualization software to teach the spatial relationships and crystal-chemical rules that govern the crystal structures of common minerals and other crystalline solids.

On the Cutting Edge Exemplary Collection This activity is part of the On the Cutting Edge Exemplary Teaching Activities collection.
Learn more about this review process.

Mineral Classification - What's in a Name? part of Cutting Edge:Mineralogy:Activities
Students derive their own scheme for identifying and naming minerals. Examples include different minerals that have the same crystal forms, and mineral species that occur with numerous forms and varieties to demonstrate the diversity of the mineral world. This exercise introduces the ambiguities encountered in classifying minerals that lead ultimately to the development of Dana's system of mineralogy.

On the Cutting Edge Exemplary Collection This activity is part of the On the Cutting Edge Exemplary Teaching Activities collection.
Learn more about this review process.


Beartooth Highway Field Trip and Activities part of NAGT:Teaching Resources:Teaching in the Field:Field Trip Collection
Darrell Henry, Louisiana State University Dave Mogk, Montana State University Intended Audience: This field trip and related exercises was used for a Teaching Petrology in the 21st Century workshop, but may be ...

Directed-Discovery of Crystal Structures Using Ball and Stick Models part of Cutting Edge:Mineralogy:Activities
In this series of exercises, a kind of reductionist approach is used to direct the students attention to specific characteristics of a variety of ball and stick models. Through a series of leading questions, students must focus on specific relationships and must rationalize these relationships according to the fundamental principles of crystal chemistry and crystallography. In this way, students will simulate and replicate the kinds of questions we would normally ask in our professional careers as mineralogists.

Field Notes part of Cutting Edge:Mineralogy:Activities
Field Notes provides instructors with helpful tips for a successful field trip. The tips include a well-developed literature review for designing and assessing field trips. Barriers to learning in the field can be overcome by reducing students' "novelty space" related to uncertainties about the geographic location, geologic setting, tasks to be mastered, expectations for final products, and concerns about personal comfort and safety.

When and How Did Continental Crust Form? part of Cutting Edge:Petrology:Teaching Examples
Many models have been proposed regarding the timing and mechanisms that first formed the continental crust. The purpose of this exercise is to help students explore the question of crustal genesis and evolution through guided discovery of the primary scientific literature to find and critically evaluate the major lines of evidence that address these various models for crustal genesis and evolution.

Modeling Exsolution (and Perthite Formation) as an Example of Complex-System Behavior part of Cutting Edge:Complex Systems:Teaching Activities
Students use a physical model, computer simulation, examples from the natural world, visualizations, and overarching thought experiments to explore this phenomenon. Exsolution embodies attributes of a complex system by exhibiting self-similar features on many scales, and emergent, self-organizing and fractionating properties.

Beartooth Highway Field Trip and Activities part of Cutting Edge:Petrology:Teaching Examples
This day-long field trip was part of the Teaching Petrology in the 21st Century workshop. The activity description/assignment file provided below includes 3 field exercises, including outcrop observation and description, exploring the origin of migmitites in an outcrop, and critical thinking about the granitization debate. The file provided below also includes a field mapping exercise for Long Lake.

Tsunami Think-Pair-Share part of Starting Point-Teaching Entry Level Geoscience:First Day of Class:Activities
David Mogk, Montana State University Course: Environmental Geology 60 students Connecting course topics to real life can be very powerful. The Activity The semester immediately following the December, 2004 tsunami ...

Courses (2)

Metamorphic Petrology part of Cutting Edge:Course Design:Goals Database
Metamorphic petrology covers the chemical and physical work done in natural systems in response to changing physical conditions. Petrogenetic processes such as recrystallization, continuous and discontinuous reactions, mixed volatile reactions and deformation are addressed. The principles of metamorphic petrology are then applied to a number of orogenic events through geologic time, and modern advances in research in metamorphic petrology are explored.

Mineralogy part of Cutting Edge:Course Design:Goals Database
Introduction to mineralogy includes the following topics: hand sample identification of rock forming minerals, including physical properties, occurrences, assemblages; principles of crystallography and crystal chemistry; introduction to optical mineralogy; introduction to modern analytical techniques, XRD and SEM/EDS; and an end-of-term research project using these techniques.

Essays (7)

An Earth Science Curriculum By Design part of Integrate:Workshops:Geoscience and the 21st Century Workforce:Essays
David Mogk, Dept. Earth Sciences, Montana State University The Department of Earth Sciences, Montana State University, recently implemented a top to bottom revision of its curriculum. We are a department that ...

Research on Learning in the Geosciences: Contexts, Goals and Opportunities part of Integrate:Workshops:Teaching the Methods of Geoscience:Essays
David Mogk, Earth Sciences, Montana State University - BozemanOriginally prepared for a workshop on Bringing Research on Learning to the Geosciences, sponsored by NSF and the Johnson Foundation, Racine WI, July ...

Teaching Geoscience Methods in the Field part of Integrate:Workshops:Teaching the Methods of Geoscience:Essays
Teaching geoscience methods in the field Dave Mogk, Dept. of Earth Sciences, Montana State University Learning in the field has traditionally been one of the fundamental components of the geoscience curriculum. ...

Teaching the methods of geoscience in a mineralogy class part of Integrate:Workshops:Teaching the Methods of Geoscience:Essays
Teaching the methods of geoscience in a mineralogy class Dave Mogk, Dept. Earth Sciences, Montana State University Mineralogy is often the "gateway" course to the geoscience major. As such, it plays an ...

Work Done On, By, and To the Earth: part of Cutting Edge:Complex Systems:Workshop 2010:Participant Essays
Complex Physical, Chemical, Biological and Anthropogenic Interactions in the Earth System David W. Mogk, Dept. of Earth Sciences, Montana State University I have advocated using an Earth system approach to ...

Dave Mogk part of Cutting Edge:Metacognition:Workshop 08:Participant Essays
Thinking As a Geologist: Master-Novice Relations and Metacognition David W. Mogk, Dept. of Earth Sciences, Montana State University For geoscience majors, and to a lesser extent for all students in my classes, one ...

David Mogk part of Cutting Edge:Affective Domain:Workshop 07:Workshop Participants
Department of Earth Sciences, Montana State University Homepage Essay 1: Teaching in the Field "We're going on a field trip!" the instructor announces enthusiastically to the class, expecting that ...

Other Contributions (26)

Department of Earth Sciences at Montana State University-Bozeman part of Integrate:Workshops:Geoscience and the 21st Century Workforce:Programs
Information for this profile was provided by David Mogk, Earth Sciences, Montana State University-Bozeman. Information is also available on the program website. Students in this program are pursuing a bachelors ...

Guided Discovery and Scoring Rubric for Petrographic Analysis of a Thin Section part of Integrate:Workshops:Teaching the Methods of Geoscience:Activity Supplement Collection
Dave Mogk, Montana State University.This page is a supplement to the original activity description found hereShort description of the activity:A guided discovery approach is used to "unpack" the methods ...

Mineralogy part of Integrate:Workshops:Teaching the Methods of Geoscience:Course Supplement Collection
Dave Mogk, Montana State University.This page is a supplement to the original course description found hereShort description of the course:Introduction to mineralogy includes the following topics: hand sample ...

Mineral Classification: What's in a Name part of Integrate:Workshops:Teaching the Methods of Geoscience:Activity Supplement Collection
Dave Mogk, Montana State University.This page is a supplement to the original activity description found hereShort description of the activity:Students derive their own scheme for identifying and naming minerals. ...

Budgets part of Earth and Mind:Posts
"Here we must speak the truth. Yes, this level of debt is unsustainable. It is also immoral. Yes, this debt is a mortal threat to our country. It is also a moral threat. It is immoral to bind our children to as leeching and destructive a force as debt. It is immoral to rob our children's future and make them beholden to China. No society is worthy that treats its children so shabbily. 'A good man leaves an inheritance for his children's children', Proverbs reminds us. For too long, Washington has been ignoring this time-honored principle. These are the remarks by House Speaker John Boehner (R-OH) to the National Religious Broadcasters Convention, Nashville, TN as delivered February 27, 2011. In preparing this speech, it is clear that Speaker Boehner is concerned about long-term impacts of our country's current spending practices, is worried about unsustainable budgetary policies, and advocates for a sense of responsibility to future generations. Implicit in these remarks is an understanding of the consequences of exponential growth, the ability to conceptualize really big numbers, and rationalization of competing rates of inputs (revenues) and outputs (expenditures) that lead to systemic instabilities that must ultimately be rectified. The alarm surrounding the burgeoning levels of the federal debt resonates with many. But one has to wonder: why does this econo-logic not translate into eco-logic?


In the Eye of the Beholder part of Earth and Mind:Posts
I recently had the pleasure of attending a multi-media performance, "A Universe of Dreams", which showed spectacular astronomical images acquired by the Hubble space telescope (more info) , set to the lilting Celtic music of the Ensemble Galilei, and with thought-provoking narrative and poetry read by Neil Conan (of NPR's "Talk of the Nation" fame). This program delivered an awe-inspiring integration of Science and Art. The images were fantastic beyond description. But, as I drifted through the images of the far universe during the presentation, I realized that I really had no idea what I was looking at. Beyond the aesthetic appeal, I had to admit that I was woefully ignorant (or at least uninformed) about the scientific significance of the images. As I searched for meaning in the gallery of images, I found myself reflecting on how the images were acquired, and for what purpose. Somebody made the decision to take a given image. What was it that they saw that compelled them to take just THAT image? What insights could they gain about the nature of the universe from this perspective? What wavelengths were recordedthe visible spectrum, infrared, ultraviolet, X-ray, or other? Are these true color images, or were these images enhanced by processing software? And most important (to me) what did the structures captured in these images reveal about cosmic history or processes? The multi-media presentation was lovely, but I wanted to know more.

Term Limits part of Earth and Mind:Posts
I'm preparing my syllabuses (syllabi?) for the coming academic term, which gave me reason to reflect on the pros and cons of academic calendars based on different lengths of the academic terms. Typically an academic year will either encompass two semesters with a 15 week term (+/- another week for exams) or three quarters with 10 week terms. Many institutions will also schedule an additional short term (e.g. a 4-1-4 monthly schedule for the academic year) to provide the opportunity for focused, immersion-type educational experiences (e.g. many liberal arts colleges), and some institutions have adopted the "block plan" in which students take a series of up to 8 classes, one at a time in a series of 3-4 week blocks of instruction (e.g. Colorado College, University of Montana-Western). Given this array of academic schedules, I wonder: what is the experience of faculty, good and bad, that result from these various academic terms, and, is there sound pedagogic research that speaks to the effectiveness of these various academic calendars? What advice can you offer about how we can come to terms with the possibilities and limitations of academic terms?

Is This Just a Phase We're Going Through? part of Earth and Mind:Posts
On May 9, 2010, the day that BP was making its first attempt to cap its renegade oil well, I was attending a short course to learn a new thermodynamic modeling program. Conversation at this workshop with other geochemists inevitably turned to the environmental disaster (debacle) that was unfolding. Even before the first capping attempt was made, it was the consensus of the participants that the exercise was doomed to failure based on first principles of thermodynamics. We were all acquainted with the carbon-oxygen-hydrogen (C-O-H) chemical system which encompasses a wide range of fluids that commonly occur in the Earth system (e.g. water, carbon dioxide, methane). Carbon, oxygen and hydrogen undergo a series of chemical reactions in response to changing physical conditions such as temperature and pressure. These chemical reactions produce phase changes that result in changes in the state of matter: volatilization or vaporization reactions that cause liquids to form gases (e.g. water vapor or steam) or crystallization reactions that result in liquids condensing to form solid materials in crystalline form (e.g. freezing water to form ice). One of these crystallization reactions forms a curious group of solid ice compounds known as gas-hydrates (aka "clathrate" compounds). These physical and chemical relationships are often represented on phase diagrams which show the stability of different phases (liquids, gases and solids) as a function of pressure and temperature (see Figure 1). Phase diagrams allow us to predict the behavior of chemical systems in changing physical conditions, and by extension, to describe the processes that are likely to occur (e.g. crystallization, melting). At a given pressure and temperature, a system of a known composition will necessarily form a unique set of phases at equilibrium (chemical species, like gases, liquids or solids of fixed composition). Any time the system is perturbed (i.e. change in pressure and/or temperature), the system will typically reorganize itself by reacting to form new stable phases. Given the composition of the fluids in and near the damaged oil well, and the ambient temperature (cold bottom waters) and pressure (from the weight of the overlying water column) on the floor of the Gulf of Mexico, the formation of solid gas hydrate ices in the neck of the capping device was completely predictable. (See the Wikipedia entry for clathrate hydrate for a description of how clathrate-hydrates are prone to form in and plug up pipelines!).

Déjà Vu All Over Again part of Earth and Mind:Posts
February 15th was the birthday of Galileo Galilei (1564). It is worth revisiting, after nearly four and a half centuries, the arguments used by Galileo to defend his theory of a heliocentric solar system based on his celestial observations as presented in his Letter to the Grand Duchess Christina (Concerning the Use of Biblical Quotations in Matters of Science, 1615). Galileo begins his letter: Some years ago...I discovered in the heavens many things that had not been seen before our own age. The novelty of these things...stirred up against me no small number of professors–as if I had placed these things in the sky with my own hands in order to upset nature and overturn the sciences. They seemed to forget that the increase of known truths stimulates the investigation, establishment and growth of the arts; not their diminution or destruction. Showing greater fondness for their own opinions than for truth, they sought to deny and disprove the new things which, if they had cared to look for themselves, their own senses would have demonstrated to them. To this end, they hurled various charges and published numerous writings filled with vain arguments, and they made the grave mistake of sprinkling these with passages taken from places in the Bible which they had failed to understand properly, and which were ill suited to their purposes. These men would perhaps not have fallen into such error had they but paid attention to a most useful doctrine of St. Augustine's ...'we ought not believe anything inadvisedly on a dubious point, lest in favor to our error we conceive a prejudice against something that truth hereafter may reveal to be not contrary in any way to the sacred books of either the Old or the New Testament'. It would appear that the cultural divide between secular and spiritual human pursuits has been with us for centuries–a false dichotomy, as Galileo demonstrates in this letter to his patron and benefactor. Science seeks to understand the universe around us while Scripture speaks to the salvation of the soul–two distinct and perhaps complementary pursuits of human nature. The lessons delivered by Galileo via his Letter to Grand Duchess Christina are very much applicable today. In this contribution I've excerpted some of the key points of analysis and reflections presented by Galileo, not only to support the Copernican model of the solar system, but also, to expose the specious arguments of his antagonists who had inappropriately used Scripture to justify their own ignorance and erroneous prejudices. As you read these centuries-old passages, consider the contemporary arguments of the "creation scientists." As you read the following passages, substitute "evolution" for "celestial mechanics" or "motions of Earth and Sun" and you'll see that it is a case of "déjà vu all over again".

Efficiency part of Earth and Mind:Posts
We hear a lot about efficiency these days. One school of economics will argue that the free market is the best way to efficiently run the economy. Civil engineers seek the most efficient way to transport storm water through a drain system to a river. A finely tuned engine runs efficiently by maximizing the conversion of the chemical potential energy of fuel into useful kinetic energy. Efficiency would seem to be next to godliness in modern culture. But upon closer scrutiny, is efficiency necessarily a good thing? The ability to transfer huge sums of money into different market sectors in an unregulated fashion efficiently created a global economic crisis; urbanization and engineered drainage systems result in peak, concentrated discharge events in river systems, efficiently transferring surface runoff into channelized flow in one part of a drainage basin, but also creating flood conditions downstream; efficient, unregulated combustion of fuels is more commonly known as an explosion. Could it be that efficient operation of systems without some sort of regulation, buffering, or mitigation ultimately leads to catastrophe? Nature, too, can be quite efficient. Earth has a remarkable capacity to work efficiently in processes that liberate and transfer huge quantities of mass and energy in a relatively short time frame: earthquakes, landslides, floods, tsunamis, extreme weather. A hurricane is an extremely efficient natural process that redistributes the thermal energy built up in tropical oceans by rapidly transferring this energy to colder, northerly latitudes. We typically refer to efficient components of the Earth system as "natural hazards", and when humanity happens to get in the way we take an anthropocentric view and call these events "catastrophes". We are facing similar efficiency-driven catastrophes in higher education.

Through a Lens Darkly and Then Face to Face* part of Earth and Mind:Posts
I've been hiking every Sunday this past fall with a group of geology majors–the Sunday Hiking Club. We are doing a service-learning project to create trailside posters and websites that explain the natural history of popular trails in the mountains surrounding our town. While on our hikes, all of the students are taking digital photographs of their experiences on the trail, and the archives of these images will serve as the raw materials for the story lines we'll present to the public. At the simplest level, our trailside posters will help direct the attention of interested hikers to the wonders they'll encounter along the trail. The premise is that the hike may be a bit more enjoyable and meaningful for recreational hikers if they know what special features to look for along the way. For the hiking public, their original motivation for going on the hike may range from exercise to aesthetics, but we think we can slip in a little science education along the way. The accompanying websites will be a bit more detailed, with in-depth information for further personal investigation with resources such as geologic maps, articles that are accessible for reading by the public, archives of annotated images, and links to related instructional sites. In observing Nature through my own lens, and also observing my students as they themselves look at the world with focused attention through their cameras, I came to realize vaguely at first, and then with increased clarity, the transformative power of photography as an instructional activity.

Not Invented Here part of Earth and Mind:Posts
There appears to be an expectation (or perception) that undergraduate faculty should be designing their own teaching activities to receive academic credit for their instructional efforts. This has resulted in the "not invented here" syndrome, which places little value on implementation of existing instructional activities in favor of development of new instructional activities. This is a rather strange value system in that a) few undergraduate faculty have formal training in curriculum design, aspects of human cognition related to learning, and assessment, b) undergraduate faculty are typically pressed for time as they attempt to meet their instructional, research and service obligations, and c) we all teach "out of field", and it is very difficult to assemble the relevant Science and accompanying instructional resources from diverse, credentialed sources. "Reinventing the wheel" for the sake of local branding of instructional products is both an inefficient and ineffective use of precious faculty time.

Winner Take All part of Earth and Mind:Posts
In 1993, Dr. Lani Guinier was nominated by President William Clinton to be the Assistant Attorney General for Civil Rights. However, prior to her confirmation hearings in the U.S. Senate, her nomination was withdrawn because of strong opposition by conservative factions that portrayed her as the "Quota Queen" based on her views about proportional representation. A biography (from Minerscarnary.org) of Dr. Guinier reports: Professor Guinier first came to public attention in 1993 when President Clinton nominated her to be the first black woman to head the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice. She had been a civil rights attorney for more than ten years and had served in the Civil Rights Division during the Carter Administration as special assistant to then Assistant Attorney General Drew S. Days. Immediately after her name was put forward in 1993, conservatives virulently attacked Guinier's views on democracy and voting, driving Clinton to withdraw her nomination without a confirmation hearing. She never got to testify on her own behalf. In response, she wrote The Tyranny of the Majority (1994, Free Press). At the risk of oversimplifying her arguments, the basis is that "winner take all" in political elections is neither fair nor an effective way to run a government, and that minorities should have the opportunity to be represented, their voices heard, and to have their needs addressed at least some of the time. What does The Tyranny of the Majority have to do with the "state" of geoscience education?

Helping Parents Help Their Children to Discover Nature part of Earth and Mind:Posts
I was on a trail run last week up to Sacagawea Peak, a popular hiking destination in the northern Bridger Range. I stopped to admire a herd of mountain goats when I encountered a young family on the trail. The boy, perhaps age 9, was just bubbling with excitement. His pockets were bulging and his hands were full of prized rock samples. He had found a treasure trove of fossils. I introduced myself as a geologist and asked if I could see his samples. We sorted through his treasures, and I helped identify brachiopods, rugose corals, a few fragments of some colonial "brain" corals, and some crinoid fragments (no calyxes today, but they can be found). (And yes, even though I'm a metamorphic petrologist I can still fully appreciate the diversity and beauty of these fossil assemblages). The crest of the Bridger Range is capped by the Mississippian Madison Limestone, and many horizons are extremely rich in these fossil beds. I pointed out that on their next visit if they go just over the pass they will find a layer of columnar structures that are known as "bioherms" and these were deposited by layering of algal mats formed along the margin of a shallow, warm sea. I also directed their attention to the cliffs above us that have been tilted to a near-vertical orientation and folded in an intricate pattern. They thanked me for this information and we went on our way. Reflecting farther up the trail, the most interesting part of this chance encounter was my conversation with the parents.

How I Got Here Part III: Towards Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in the Earth Sciences part of Earth and Mind:Posts
View Part I: Enlightenment. View Part II: Building Community. The last decade has been a whirlwind of opportunities to work on behalf of Earth science education on many fronts: course and curriculum improvement, pedagogy, integrating research and education, use of information technologies and digital resources to support instruction, faculty professional development, discipline-specific research on learning in the Earth sciences....

How I Got Here Part II: Building Community part of Earth and Mind:Posts
View Part I: Enlightenment. I was ready for a change in my academic life. And, I was on a mission. How could anything as important as living responsibly on Earth (through understanding Earth history, its components and processes) be so grossly underrepresented in STEM education and in society? I began to seek out kindred spirits with similar interests and concerns (Dex Perkins, John Brady), made presentations at national professional society meetings, organized theme sessions, and most importantly, began to become involved with NSF conferences and advisory boards. I recognized that the most direct route towards empowering Earth science education was through the various grant programs at NSF. In 1995-96 I was honored to be appointed as Program Officer at NSF in the Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE). This was the first time that an Earth scientist served in this position

Conation part of Earth and Mind:Posts
This past week I had the opportunity to join Cathy Manduca and her family on a backpacking trip to the Spanish Peaks area in the northern Madison Range just southwest of Bozeman, Montana. This is an area where I have had an ongoing research project for ~25 years, and beyond the social aspects of the trip, and my desire to share this special place with my friends, I needed to go back and re-check the field relations in a very complicated high-grade ductile shear zone. An eight mile hike and ~2800 foot gain of elevation to 9000 feet brought me to the Spanish Lake campsite. I simply had to go back to this area to take another look, to see the area with fresh eyes informed by some new data, to acquire some more structural data, to collect a few more samples for additional thermobarometry and thermochronology analysis, and to reconfirm our working model on the structural evolution of this area before I could hope to write up the results for a scholarly publication this winter. Walking on a steep trail under a heavy pack (camp gear, sledge hammer, mapping equipment, and of course fishing gear) has a way of freeing your mind to wander as you head towards camp, and on this hike I happened to fixate on the factor of mind known as conation.

How I Got Here Part I: Enlightenment part of Earth and Mind:Posts
Midway through my academic career (post-tenure) I had a latent suspicion that things weren't right. I was covering the traditional content in a variety of introductory, mineralogy, and petrology courses, but it was clear that the students weren't "getting it", they were generally uninspired (by the science that I was truly excited about) and often were resistant to my class activities and were sometimes openly hostile ("this is not relevant, I'll never use this stuff"), and I was generally dissatisfied with my own teaching performance and the overall environment in my classes. Then I had a remarkable convergence of three disparate events that fundamentally changed my outlook and practice in education:

Mining: We Depend On It part of Starting Point-Teaching Entry Level Geoscience:First Day of Class:Activities
David Mogk, Montana State University Course: Environmental Geology 60 students Connecting course topics to students' lives is a very effective strategy to motivate their learning. The Activity I present ...

Learning Styles: VARK part of Starting Point-Teaching Entry Level Geoscience:First Day of Class:Activities
David Mogk, Montana State University Course: Environmental Geology 60 students Learning styles vary greatly from individual to individual. There are several instruments available for measuring learning styles. The ...

When and how did continental crust form? part of Cutting Edge:Early Earth:Key Questions about the Early Earth
submitted by David Mogk, Montana State University Why is this question important? The genesis and evolution of continental crust is one of the fundamental questions that remains unresolved in the geosciences. ...

Activity Models part of Integrating Research and Education:Teaching Phase Equilibria
Dex Perkins, University of North Dakota; Andrea Koziol, University of Dayton; and Dave Mogk, Montana State University Introduction Minerals may have many different compositions in nature and, therefore, the ...

Gibbs' Phase Rule: Where it all Begins part of Integrating Research and Education:Teaching Phase Equilibria
David Mogk, Montana State University Introduction Minerals are the monitors of the physical and chemical conditions under which they formed. The occurrences of minerals, their parageneses (stable associations), ...

Method of Schreinemakers A Geometric Approach to Constructing Phase Diagrams part of Integrating Research and Education:Teaching Phase Equilibria
Dexter Perkins, University of North Dakota and Dave Mogk, Montana State University If you would like an 13-page long summary of the information presented on this page, perhaps to use as a class handout, click link ...

X-ray reflection in accordance with Bragg's Law part of Integrating Research and Education:Geochemical Instrumentation and Analysis
Darrell Henry, Louisiana State University Nelson Eby, University of Massachusetts - Lowell John Goodge, University of Minnesota - Duluth David Mogk, Montana State University When a crystal is bombarded with X-rays ...

Advanced Modeling Programs: Introduction to the THERMOCALC Mineral Equilibria Modeling Software part of Integrating Research and Education:Teaching Phase Equilibria
Julie Baldwin, University of Montana; Dexter Perkins, University of North Dakota; and Dave Mogk, Montana State University What is it? THERMOCALC is thermodynamic calculation software for tackling mineral ...


Events and Communities

Hazards Webinar January 2012: PI

Hazards Webinar February 2012: PI

Hazards Webinar November 2011: PI

Geochemistry 2005 Participants: PI

Affective Domain 2007 Participants: PI

Early Earth 2007 Participants: PI

The Role of Metacognition in Teaching Geoscience Participants: PI

Energy Workshop 2009 Participants: PI

Developing Student Understanding of Complex Systems in the Geosciences Participants: PI

Climate Change: PI

Early Career '02 Participants: PI

Teaching Petrology Participants: PI

Data, Simulations, and Models Workshop 2002 Participants: PI

Research on Learning: PI

Teaching Biocomplexity in the Geosciences Workshop Participants: PI

Temporal Learning Journal Club: PI

Teaching Structural Geology Participants: PI

Teaching Service Learning in the Geosciences Participants: PI

Using GIS and Remote Sensing to Teach Geoscience in the 21st Century Participants: PI

Geochemistry 2010 Participants: PI

Visualizing Seismic Waves for Teaching and Research Participants: PI

Understanding the Deep Earth Participants: PI

Teaching Geoscience in the Field in the 21st Century Participants: PI

Ocean System 2005 Participants: PI

Student Learning: Observing and Assessing 2005 Participants: PI

Public Policy Workshop Participants: PI

Geology and Human Health Participants: PI

Mineralogy, Petrology, Geochemistry Workshop Participants 2011: PI

Teaching About Complex Systems Using the STELLA Modeling Software Participants

Visualization Workshop 2004 Participants: PI

2011 AGU Heads and Chairs Workshop Participants

Hazards Webinar March 2012: PI

Teaching Environmental Geology 2012: PI

ITG Teaching the Methods of Geoscience workshop 2012: Leader

ITG Teacher Preparation Module Development Meeting

CE-CUR Undergraduate Research Soiree: PI

2012 AGU Heads and Chairs Workshop: Presenter

Geophotography 2013: PI

ITG Geoscience and the 21st Century Workforce

2013 AGU Heads and Chairs Workshop Participants

Oceanography Workshop 2013

GeoEthics 2014: PI

Cutting Edge 2014 Undergrad Research: PI