NAGT > For Your Students > Scholarships for Field Study > NAGT Field Study Scholarship Application

NAGT Scholarships for Field Study

Please complete your application and submit your accompanying materials using this form. Note that if you navigate away from this page without submitting the form, any work you have completed will be lost and not submitted.

Application Form

General

Advanced undergraduate students with a GPA of 3.0 or better are eligible for $500 scholarships to help defray the cost of a field course in geosciences. The application deadline is February 14. Review of applications will take approximately four to six weeks. To be eligible for an NAGT scholarship, a student must attend a field course in geosciences that is at least a total of four weeks in duration (it is not necessary that these be consecutive) and that engages the student primarily in field work, rather than classroom work.







If you answered "yes," please be sure your ethnic origin is noted on two letters of recommendation from instructors acquainted with your work.

Demographics















School Information







Field Course Information















Additional Materials

There are several additional materials needed for your application to be complete.

  • A 250-word essay explaining why a field camp experience is an important part of your specific geoscience degree objectives.
  • A transcript of all your college work.
  • Contact information (name, address, telephone number, and email) for two faculty members who have agreed to write recommendations for you in support of your application. We will contact them directly to obtain the recommendation.
Essay

Transcript
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Reuse License

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If you are the creator we strongly encourage you to select the CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike option.

If none of the above licenses apply describe the conditions under which this material appears on this site as well as any information about reuse beyond this site.

Distributing information on the web generally requires the permission of the copyright holder--usually the original creator. Providing the information we request here will help visitors to this site understand the ways in which they may (legally) use what they find.

If you created this file (and haven't signed away your copyright) then we'd encourage you to select the CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike option. You'll retain the copyright to your file and can do as you please with it in the future. Through this choice you are also explicitly allowing others to reuse that file as long as they give you attribution, and don't use it for commercial purposes.

If the file (or content within it) was created by others you'll need their permission. If it predates 1923 or was created by a U.S federal employee (as part of their job) it is likely in the public domain (and we can all do as we choose with it). The original author may also have explicitly stated how it may be reused (e.g. through a creative commons license). You can describe the licensing/reuse situation in the box above.

Without permission you should not upload the file. There are several options in this case:

  • You can contact the original author to get permission.
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  • You can find a substitute that isn't encumbered by copyright.
  • You can create a substitute yourself. Remember, ideas can't be copyrighted, only particular expressions of those ideas. Of course you'll want to give credit the original author.

The Stanford Copyright and Fair Use Center has more good information about copyright as it applies to academic settings.

Letters of RecommendationPlease provide the contact information (name, address, telephone number, and email) for two faculty members who have agreed to write recommendations for you in support of your application. We will contact them directly to obtain the recommendation.




NAGT/AWG Member Endorsement

Any questions or comments about this program should be directed to:
Erica Zweifel





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